Daffodil (Common name)

General poisoning notes:

Daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) is an ornamental that is planted outdoors as a spring-flowering perennial. It may be used indoors as a forced flower during the winter. The aboveground parts cause dermatitis in sensitive individuals. The bulbs can also cause dermatitis. Humans have been poisoned after ingesting bulbs thought to be onions, as have cattle when they were fed bulbs instead of feed in times of scarcity. Family pets may be at risk if they ingest daffodils (Mitchell and Rook 1979, Litovitz and Fahey 1982, Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.
  • Gonçalo, S., Freitas, J. D., Sousa, I. 1987. Contact dermatitis and respiratory symptoms and Narcissus pseudonarcissus. Contact Dermatitis, 16: 115-116.
  • Litovitz, T. L., Fahey, B. A. 1982. Please don't eat the daffodils. N. Eng. J. Med., 306: 547.
  • Mitchell, J. C., Rook, A. 1979. Botanical dermatology. Greenglass Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 787 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Narcissus pseudonarcissus L.
Vernacular name(s):
daffodil
Scientific family name:
Amaryllidaceae
Vernacular family name:
amaryllis

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Narcissus pseudonarcissus

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

Plant or plant parts used in or around the home.

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

Images: daffodil - Google Search

Notes on Poisonous plant parts:

The bulbs of narcissus are toxic if ingested. All parts of the plant can cause allergic dermatitis in sensitive humans (Mitchell and Rook 1979).

Toxic parts:

  • bulbs
  • flowers
  • leaves
  • stems

References:

  • Gonçalo, S., Freitas, J. D., Sousa, I. 1987. Contact dermatitis and respiratory symptoms and Narcissus pseudonarcissus. Contact Dermatitis, 16: 115-116.
  • Lampe, K. F., McCann, M. A. 1985. AMA Handbook of poisonous and injurious plants. American Medical Assoc. Chicago, Ill., USA. 432 pp.
  • Mitchell, J. C., Rook, A. 1979. Botanical dermatology. Greenglass Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 787 pp.

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • lycorine

References:

  • Lampe, K. F., McCann, M. A. 1985. AMA Handbook of poisonous and injurious plants. American Medical Assoc. Chicago, Ill., USA. 432 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Cattle

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

During World War II, cattle were fed daffodil bulbs because of scarce feed. They developed seizures, sedation, hypotension, and gastrointestinal and hepatic degeneration. Animal poisoning is more severe than human poisoning because humans develop rapid emesis (Litovitz and Fahey 1982, Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.
  • Litovitz, T. L., Fahey, B. A. 1982. Please don't eat the daffodils. N. Eng. J. Med., 306: 547.

Humans

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

Ingesting daffodil bulbs produces the following symptoms: abdominal pains, vomiting, nausea, lightheadedness, shivering, and sometimes diarrhea. Because emesis is rapid, more severe symptoms do not usually occur. Ingesting bulbs is rare (Litovitz and Fahey 1982, Lampe and McCann 1985).

References:

  • Gonçalo, S., Freitas, J. D., Sousa, I. 1987. Contact dermatitis and respiratory symptoms and Narcissus pseudonarcissus. Contact Dermatitis, 16: 115-116.
  • Litovitz, T. L., Fahey, B. A. 1982. Please don't eat the daffodils. N. Eng. J. Med., 306: 547.
  • Mitchell, J. C., Rook, A. 1979. Botanical dermatology. Greenglass Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 787 pp.

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