English bluebell (Common name)

General poisoning notes:

English bluebell (Endymion non-scriptus) is an ornamental bulb plant that is grown outdoors and forced indoors for its early spring flowers. This species was formerly included under the genus Scilla. The plant contains glycosides, which are chemically similar to the cardiac glycoside digitalis. Cattle, a horse, and humans were poisoned after ingesting this plant. Children or family pets should be prevented from chewing the plants (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Hyacinthoides nonscripta (L.) Garcke
Vernacular name(s):
English bluebell
Scientific family name:
Liliaceae
Vernacular family name:
lily

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Hyacinthoides nonscripta

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. , Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/ Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

Plant or plant parts used in or around the home.

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

Images: English bluebell - Google Search

Toxic parts:

  • All parts
  • Bulbs
  • Flowers
  • Leaves

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Notes on Toxic plant chemicals:

The plant contains glycosides, generally termed scillarens, which are similar to the cardiac glycoside digitalis (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • unknown chemical

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Cattle

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

A group of cows and calves in Britain grazed on English bluebells and a few days later became dull and lethargic, chewed intermittently, and produced hard, dry feces. Temperature and respiration were decreased and heart beat became erratic. Lactating cows became dry. Recovery was slow when the cows were removed from the plants and given extra feed (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Horses

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

A horse that ate several bulbs of English bluebell became ill within 6 h. Symptoms included initial choking, abdominal pain, slow pulse, low temperature, and cold, clammy skin. Within 10 h the animal produced dark-colored diarrhea with blood and ceased urinating. The horse recovered slowly, passing blood-stained urine for several days (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Humans

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

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