golden-trumpet (Common name)

General poisoning notes:

Golden-trumpet (Allamanda cathartica) is an indoor ornamental vine that is suited to greenhouses. It is considered poisonous, but firm evidence is lacking. The plant was once used as a cathartic. Ingesting the fruits may cause upset stomach (Kingsbury 1964; Hardin and Arena 1969).

There is a case of a young boy who was sucking the end of the stem of this plant. He subsequently became nauseated, and developed a high temperature and swollen lips. Some individuals develop a rash from the plant sap (Morton 1962).

References:

Hardin, J. W., Arena, J. M. 1969. Human poisoning from native and cultivated plants. Duke University Press, Durham, N.C., USA. 167 pp.

Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N. J., USA. 626 pp.

Morton, J. F. 1962. Ornamental plants with toxic and or irritant properties. II. Proc. Fla. State Hortic. Soc., 75: 484-491.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name
Allamanda cathartica L.
Vernacular name(s)
golden-trumpet
Scientific family name
Apocynaceae
Vernacular family name
dogbane

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Allamanda cathartica

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada, Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa,Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

Plant or plant parts used in or around the home.

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

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Notes on Poisonous plant parts:

This plant has an unidentified toxin in the fruits and in the cell sap of the stem and leaves (Hardin and Arena 1969). The plant is used only as an indoor ornamental in Canada, most likely found in greenhouses because it is a large climbing vine.

Toxic parts:

  • mature fruit
    plant juices

References:

  • Hardin, J. W., Arena, J. M. 1969. Human poisoning from native and cultivated plants. Duke University Press, Durham, N.C., USA. 167 pp.
  • Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N. J., USA. 626 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Humans

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

Hardin, J. W., Arena, J. M. 1969. Human poisoning from native and cultivated plants. Duke University Press, Durham, N.C., USA. 167 pp.

Morton, J. F. 1962. Ornamental plants with toxic and or irritant properties. II. Proc. Fla. State Hortic. Soc., 75: 484-491.

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