Pin cherry (Common name)

General poisoning notes:

Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) is a native tree found throughout most of Canada. The leaves have an average N rate of 91 mg/100 g, with as much as 143 mg/100 g recorded. These levels are potentially lethal to livestock if ingested. M. Pitcher (personal communication) notes that captive moose in Newfoundland and Alberta nature parks and zoos regurgitate a gray, chalky, paste-like substance when fed pin cherry browse mixed with their normal browse, white birch (Betula papyrifera). Livestock that ingest pin cherry plant material can be poisoned (Kingsbury 1964).

References:

  • Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Prunus pensylvanica L. f.
Vernacular name(s):
pin cherry
Scientific family name:
Rosaceae
Vernacular family name:
rose

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Prunus pensylvanica

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

  • Alberta
  • British Columbia
  • Labrador
  • Manitoba
  • New Brunswick
  • Northwest Territories
  • Nova Scotia
  • Ontario
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Quebec
  • Saskatchewan

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

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Toxic parts:

  • leaves

References:

  • Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • amygdalin
  • prunasin

References:

  • Cheeke, P. R., Shull, L. R. 1985. Natural toxicants in feeds and poisonous plants. AVI Publishing Company, Inc., Westport, Conn., USA. 492 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Moose

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

M. Pitcher (personal communication) states that captive moose develop an adverse reaction to pin cherry when the plant is inadvertently mixed with their usual browse, white birch (Betula papyrifera). The moose regurgitate a gray, chalky paste-like substance. This has been noted both in Newfoundland and Alberta.

References:

  • Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

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