Primula (Common name)

General poisoning notes:

Primula (Primula obconica) is an ornamental herb that may be grown indoors or outdoors. Sensitized humans develop dermatitis from exposure to the allergen contained in hairs on leaves and other plant parts. Pollen also can cause dermatitis. Some other species of the genus Primula can cause dermatitis as well (Mitchell and Rook 1979).

References:

  • Fernandez De Corrs, L., Leanizbarrutia, I., Munoz, D., Bernaola, G., Fernandez, E. 1987. Contact dermatitis from a neighbour's primula. Contact Dermatitis, 16: 234-235.
  • Mitchell, J. C., Rook, A. 1979. Botanical dermatology. Greenglass Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 787 pp.
  • Spoerke, D. G., Smolinske, S. C. 1990. Toxicity of houseplants. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Primula obconica Hance.
Vernacular name(s):
primula
Scientific family name:
Primulaceae
Vernacular family name:
primrose

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

Plant or plant parts used in or around the home.

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

Images: primula - Google Search

Notes on Poisonous plant parts:

Minute glandular hairs accumulate the allergen, which is exuded in tiny drops. The hairs are most common on the leaves but are also found on other plant parts. The pollen grains can also cause dermatitis (Mitchell and Rook 1979).

Toxic parts:

  • flowers
  • hairs
  • leaves

References:

  • Mitchell, J. C., Rook, A. 1979. Botanical dermatology. Greenglass Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 787 pp.

Notes on Toxic plant chemicals:

Primin, a quinone, is the allergen in primula. This chemical is found in minute (0.05-0.3 mm long) glandular hairs. The concentrated allergen accumulates as irregular resinous drops on the hairs. Highly sensitive people may react to 20 micro gm of the allergen. The allergen content of primula is highest between April and August, when grown outdoors (Mitchell and Rook 1979).

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • primin

References:

  • Mitchell, J. C., Rook, A. 1979. Botanical dermatology. Greenglass Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 787 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Humans

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

  • Fernandez De Corrs, L., Leanizbarrutia, I., Munoz, D., Bernaola, G., Fernandez, E. 1987. Contact dermatitis from a neighbour's primula. Contact Dermatitis, 16: 234-235.

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