Alstroemeria ligtu (Scientific name)

General poisoning notes:

Peruvian lily (Alstromeria ligtu) is grown as a cut flower by the florist industry. Cut flowers are also flown into North America from Holland. This plant causes contact dermatitis to workers who may be sensitized to the chemical tuliposide A, which is also found in tulip plants. This chemical readily penetrates vinyl gloves. Nitrile gloves may prevent the allergic reaction of workers sensitive to this chemical (Marks 1988).

References:

  • Marks, J. G. 1988. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Arch. Dermatol., 124: 914-916.
  • Santucci, B., Picardo, M., Iavaroni, C., Trogolo, C. 1985. Contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Contact Dermatitis, 12: 215-219.
  • Spoerke, D. G., Smolinske, S. C. 1990. Toxicity of houseplants. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., 335 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Alstroemeria ligtu L.
Vernacular name(s):
Peruvian lily
Scientific family name:
Amaryllidaceae
Vernacular family name:
amaryllis

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. , Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, , Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

Plant or plant parts used in or around the home.

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

Images: Alstroemeria ligtu - Google Search

Toxic parts:

  • plant juices

References:

  • Marks, J. G. 1988. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Arch. Dermatol., 124: 914-916.
  • Santucci, B., Picardo, M., Iavaroni, C., Trogolo, C. 1985. Contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Contact Dermatitis, 12: 215-219.

Notes on Toxic plant chemicals:

The lactone 6-tuliposide A occurs in both the Peruvian lily and in tulip plants. A human who becomes sensitized to one of the plants generally becomes cross-reactive to the other plant. In a series of tests, it took about 3 years for workers to become sensitive to Peruvian lily (Santucci et al. 1985).

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • tuliposide A
  • 6-tuliposide A

References:

  • Marks, J. G. 1988. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Arch. Dermatol., 124: 914-916.
  • Santucci, B., Picardo, M., Iavaroni, C., Trogolo, C. 1985. Contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Contact Dermatitis, 12: 215-219.
  • Spoerke, D. G., Smolinske, S. C. 1990. Toxicity of houseplants. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., 335 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Humans

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

  • Marks, J. G. 1988. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Arch. Dermatol., 124: 914-916.
  • Santucci, B., Picardo, M., Iavaroni, C., Trogolo, C. 1985. Contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. Contact Dermatitis, 12: 215-219.

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