Lupinus argenteus (Scientific name)

General poisoning notes:

Silvery lupine (Lupinus argenteus) is a western range plant that has caused sickness and death in sheep in western North America. Ingestion of this plant by pregnant cattle can also cause teratogenic effects in calves (Cheeke and Schull 1985, Keeler 1989). See additional notes under silky lupine (Lupinus sericeus).

References:

  • Cheeke, P. R., Shull, L. R. 1985. Natural toxicants in feeds and poisonous plants. AVI Publishing Company, Inc., Westport, Conn., USA. 492 pp.
  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Lupinus argenteus Pursh
Vernacular name(s):
silvery lupine
Scientific family name:
Leguminosae
Vernacular family name:
pea

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Lupinus argenteus

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. , Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

  • Alberta
  • British Columbia
  • Manitoba
  • Saskatchewan

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

Images: Lupinus argenteus - Google Search

Notes on Poisonous plant parts:

The concentration of anagyrine decreases in the leaves once the seeds begin to form, and then is greatest in the seeds. Total alkaloid content is greatest in the seeds. See notes under silky lupine (Lupinus sericeus) for additional information.

Toxic parts:

  • leaves
  • seeds

References:

  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

Notes on Toxic plant chemicals:

Two alkaloids, lupanine and sparteine, (both quinolizidine alkaloids), are probably involved in causing poisoning in sheep (Keeler 1989). This species also has been found to contain 3.34 g/kg of anagyrine, exceeding the minimum level of 1.44 g/kg needed to cause crooked calf disease (Davis 1982, Davis and Stout 1986).

Toxic plant chemicals:

anagyrine

lupanine

Chemical diagram(s) are courtesy of Ruth McDiarmid, Biochemistry Technician, Kamloops Range Station, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Kamploops, British Columbia, Canada.

References:

  • Davis, A. M., Stout, D. M. 1986. Anagyrine in western American lupines. J. Range Manage., 39: 29-30.
  • Davis, A. M. 1982. The occurrence of anagyrine in a collection of western American lupines. J. Range Manage., 35: 81-84.
  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Cattle

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

Sheep

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

Symptoms of ingestion include labored breathing, which may be accompanied by snoring, trembling, convulsions, coma, and death from respiratory paralysis (Keeler 1989). See additional notes under silky lupine Lupinus sericeus).

References:

  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

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