Lupinus polyphyllus (Scientific name)

General poisoning notes:

Large-leaved lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus) is a native of British Columbia and has been introduced in eastern Canada. This species has been used in developing many of the cultivars of lupines grown in gardens. Davis and Stout (1986) measured quantities of anagyrine that exceeded the minimum necessary to cause crooked calf disease (teratogenic deformities) in calves. The literature does not include any documented cases. Care should be taken to prevent pregnant cattle from feeding on this lupine from day 40 to day 70 of gestation. See additional notes under silky lupine Lupinus sericeus).

References:

  • Davis, A. M., Stout, D. M. 1986. Anagyrine in western American lupines. J. Range Manage., 39: 29-30.
  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name:
Lupinus polyphyllus Lindl.
Vernacular name(s):
large-leaved lupine
Scientific family name:
Leguminosae
Vernacular family name:
pea

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Lupinus polyphyllus

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. , Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

  • British Columbia
  • New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia
  • Ontario
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Quebec

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

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Toxic parts:

  • leaves
  • stems

References:

  • Davis, A. M., Stout, D. M. 1986. Anagyrine in western American lupines. J. Range Manage., 39: 29-30.

Notes on Toxic plant chemicals:

Anagyrine, a quinolizidine alkaloid, has been measured in amounts exceeding the minimum 1.44 g/kg required to cause teratogenic effects. A measurement of 6.10 g/kg is reported by Davis and Stout (1986) in the aboveground portion of a plant.

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • anagyrine

References:

  • Davis, A. M., Stout, D. M. 1986. Anagyrine in western American lupines. J. Range Manage., 39: 29-30.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Cattle

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

  • Keeler, R. F. 1989. Quinolizidine alkaloids in range and grain lupins. Pages 133-167 in Cheeke, P. R., ed. Toxicants of plant origin. Vol. I. Alkaloids. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., USA. 335 pp.

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