Ranunculus sceleratus

General poisoning notes:

Celery-leaved buttercup (Ranunculus sceleratus) is a native herb found across most of Canada. This plant contains a toxic irritant that produces protoanemonin upon mastication. All types of livestock can become ill upon ingestion, but cattle are most commonly affected. Horses and goats have also been poisoned (Cooper and Johnson 1984, Fuller and McClintock 1986).

References:

Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Fuller, T. C., McClintock, E. 1986. Poisonous plants of California. Univ. California Press, Berkeley, Calif., USA. 432 pp.

Nomenclature:

Scientific Name
Ranunculus sceleratus L.
Vernacular name(s)
celery-leaved buttercup
Scientific family name
Ranunculaceae
Vernacular family name
crowfoot

Go to ITIS*ca for more taxonomic information on: Ranunculus sceleratus

References:

  • Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. , Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.
  • Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.
  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.
  • Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.
  • Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

  • Alberta
  • British Columbia
  • Labrador
  • Manitoba
  • Newfoundland
  • Northwest Territories
  • Ontario
  • Quebec
  • Saskatchewan
  • Yukon Territory

References:

  • Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.
  • Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Image or illustration

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Notes on Poisonous plant parts:

The plant juices contain the glycoside, which is converted to the irritant protoanemonin. The concentration is highest during flowering (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

Toxic parts:

  • plant juices

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Notes on Toxic plant chemicals:

Ranunculin, a glycoside, becomes a volatile irritant, protoanemonin, after enzyme-mediated conversion through mastication (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

Toxic plant chemicals:

  • ranunculin

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty'sStationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Cattle

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

Ingesting the celery-leaved buttercup causes salivation, abdominal pain, and inflammation of the mouth. In more serious cases, severe ulceration of the mouth and of the digestive and urinary systems occurs. The animal excretes dark-colored diarrhea and urine. Unsteady gait occurs in the hind legs, and vision can be impaired or lost. Convulsion precedes death, although fatalities are rare. Animals should not be allowed to graze pastures for at least 2 weeks after spraying with 2,4-D because the plants may be grazed selectively by animals (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Fuller, T. C., McClintock, E. 1986. Poisonous plants of California. Univ. California Press, Berkeley, Calif., USA. 432 pp.

Goats

General symptoms of poisoning:

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

Horses

General symptoms of poisoning:

Notes on poisoning:

A horse was poisoned after ingesting celery-leaved buttercup. Symptoms included paralysis, muscle tremors, colic, convulsions, and loss of hearing and sight. Recovery occurred over a few days but weakness persisted (Cooper and Johnson 1984).

References:

  • Cooper, M. R., Johnson, A. W. 1984. Poisonous plants in Britain and their effects on animals and man. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England. 305 pp.

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